Skip to main content

Replies sorted oldest to newest

Blues..
Can't fiqure that one out...how can a officer drive a unit without a driver's license...if he can't do his job, then how can he do his job...

As an Officer , you know when you take the Job you give up certain rights that citizens get to keep...

To me that is lowering the standards to match the behavior of a few and not the over all force...We had a saying in the S.O....Hard to get on....Easy to get off...
Last edited by trader
In a department as large as Memphis has, there are bound to be numerous non-driving jobs for personnel...jailer, latent prints, etc.

Both Tennessee and Alabama use deferred prosecution in courts for DUI on a regular basis. If the officer is eligible, a deferment would allow the policy Memphis has adopted to work. Notice, the article states "arrested for DUI", not convicted. That indicates to me that a deferment may be what gets used.


In a smaller department where everyone has to drive for patrol or traffic enforcement purposes, this policy could not work.
Military rules are much different. Driving privileges can be suspended for up to two years on the base. They can be demoted and pay revoked. Their career can be ruined.

If I ever need the assistance of police in a life or death situation, I would hope they send one that is not drunk or hungover. Sounds like that is no longer an option in Memphis.

BTW...Trader you are as wrong as sugar on grits about the coast guard.
If you bothered to read the article, or even the first sentence, you would see that it applies to OFF-DUTY officers. I don't want a surgeon working on me or an airline pilot flying me somewhere that is drunk ON-DUTY but personally I don't believe they should necessarily lose any professional privileges or be terminated for an off-duty DUI. They're just like any other citizen when off-duty. And I realize that the military can suspend on-base driving privileges or impose other penalties for DUIs that happen off-base. The point is, military members are also in life/death situations daily and they can be allowed some latitude for a DUI. There's no reason cops shouldn't be in the same boat. If every public official that got stopped for driving drunk was "terminated," we'd be replacing them all over the place. It must be lonely being perfect.
quote:
Originally posted by lawguy07:
If you bothered to read the article, or even the first sentence, you would see that it applies to OFF-DUTY officers. I don't want a surgeon working on me or an airline pilot flying me somewhere that is drunk ON-DUTY but personally I don't believe they should necessarily lose any professional privileges or be terminated for an off-duty DUI. They're just like any other citizen when off-duty. And I realize that the military can suspend on-base driving privileges or impose other penalties for DUIs that happen off-base. The point is, military members are also in life/death situations daily and they can be allowed some latitude for a DUI. There's no reason cops shouldn't be in the same boat. If every public official that got stopped for driving drunk was "terminated," we'd be replacing them all over the place. It must be lonely being perfect.



A person can still be drunk/hungover from the night before.

I don't want a person that drinks/drugs as my doctor either.
quote:
Originally posted by trader:
Sorry SJ...Just retired from 30 years with the Coast Guard...and set in on many of hearings for alcohol related offenses....
Just recently watched a young man 20 get kicked out for his 3rd offense...


Unless the regulations have changed (please link) it is as I said. CG regs

You may have witnessed a discharge for another reason that started with the dui's.
SJ...
I was a part of the hearing board...

During a hearing a Coast Guardsman can ask that a Senior Petty Officer be his representative before the board.

That young man chose me to represent him in this particular case. Unfortunately, it was not this case that got him a discharge, it was the fact it was his Third. The Second was a DUI, the first was a Public Drunk and Disorderly Conduct charge so to say I must be mistaken about the case I'm afraid not.....I also know the Coast Guard Guidelines...

Alcohol incidents are looked at very harshly by the Coast Guard...The reason is a Coast Guardsman is classified as an Federal Officer enforcing Boating Laws, Fisheries, Water Pollution, etc...
We come under the Department of Homeland Security...NOT the Department of Defense...
Last edited by trader
quote:
Originally posted by lawguy07:
If you bothered to read the article, or even the first sentence, you would see that it applies to OFF-DUTY officers. I don't want a surgeon working on me or an airline pilot flying me somewhere that is drunk ON-DUTY but personally I don't believe they should necessarily lose any professional privileges or be terminated for an off-duty DUI. They're just like any other citizen when off-duty. And I realize that the military can suspend on-base driving privileges or impose other penalties for DUIs that happen off-base. The point is, military members are also in life/death situations daily and they can be allowed some latitude for a DUI. There's no reason cops shouldn't be in the same boat. If every public official that got stopped for driving drunk was "terminated," we'd be replacing them all over the place. It must be lonely being perfect.


Most Airlines you cannot work if you are convicted of a DUI due to no license and you have to report it to the FAA. The Memphis Chief of Police was on the news last night and stated if convicted the officer would loose his job.

Add Reply


Untitled Document
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×