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We had a visit to our home last week from a man named Jim Cassel who is the florence building inspector. He was at my home to report a complaint about a truck parked on the road. The complaint was that the truck seemed to be broke and needed to be moved. This truck (81 ford mud truck) belongs to a relative who is from out of town visiting me. I know for a fact that the vehicle is 100% functional and is used quite often. Additionally, I am not aware of any ordinance that is being violated with the city of Florence nor is there a justifiable reason for this inquiry which personally I find insulting since this is a close family member who came here for the birth of my daughter. I am actually embarrassed that they had to receive such a negative reception from our cities representitives not to mention Jim Cassel speaking directly to a minor concerning this alleged complaint, and never once speaking or asking to speak with the owner of the home nor an adult. It was also pointed out that Jim had stated that the vehicle doesn't fit into this neighborhood (Heathrow Subdivision) so I would like to know, what exactly does "fit into this neighborhood", because he did mention if it were a newer model vehicle that it could be parked on the side of the road.

Considering I am a business owner who employs twenty five people in this community, I am seriously wondering how our local government portrays its communities, not to mention the fact that his representation of our local government is very likely out of line with how this should have been handled, not to mention this alledged complaint from some neighbor(s) could have been handled directly with myself (the homeowner). I have not had a single person approach me in my neighborhood about this and would have thought if there was a complaint, a respectable neighbor would have taken the initiative to directly approach me about this. Perhaps Jim Cassel could enlighten me as to which neighbor has a potential complaint so I can address this with them directly in a considerate manor and not the cold reception that my family members received from the muncipal office.

So in closing I would like to thank the city of Florence, and Jim Cassel for demonstrating what a wonderfully unprofessional, prejudice and judgemental representation of our local government and how the city of Florence handles itself with its residents. Next time I have relatives or out of state customers who visit our community, how our government is and that they should park in the yard so they fit in with our discriminating local government.

Regards, momo
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The side of the road is the city's right of way. Simple solution, move the truck into the yard since it's only going to be there temporarily.

A lot of neighborhoods have home owner's associations. All of them have their own rules, but some do not allow beat up vehicles to be parked on the street, the yard, or anywhere in sight.

I think it might be a worse image if an out of state visitor drove through a nice neighborhood and saw a late model truck covered in mud sitting on the side of the road. I wouldn't want to see that on my street.

That's just part of living in a big neighborhood. You may own your property, but you share your view.
quote:
Originally posted by Rattattue:
Sounds like typical City of florence.
NashBama it is supposed to rain Saturday so you better stay inside cause as far as you got your nose stuck up in the air you will drown


Well that isn't a very nice thing to say.

The person posted his problem on a public forum for anyone to voice their opinion on it. I simply voiced my opinion, you're free to agree or disagree.


Even though I was raised in rural area outside of Florence, I was still taught to have consideration for my neighbors. You see that as being stuck up? Why?
I can't understand people who are offended by a pick up truck parked on the side of the road. Especially, I can't understand people being offended by the model year of the truck? If it was on blocks, I could understand, but a working truck? And a visitor to someone's home?

What about being neighborly? Sounds like a new baby is coming. They might have some company. Let the people who are from out of town who are staying in the home park on the side of the road so that other visitors can park in the driveway.

I would not want to live in a neighborhood with people who are so easily 'offended'. It's a truck. If this gives people a 'bad impression' of me, that just shows that these aren't people I want to impress in the first place.

As for the inspector...if he really did say that a later model would be ok, I would need to see the ordinance that delineates what years are acceptable.

It's a visitor, and there a new baby coming. I'm not saying you have to let the Clampetts pitch a tent in your neighborhood. I just think a little tolerance wouldn't kill anyone.
It isn't abandoned! It's someone vehicle!

The explanation that it is a working truck owned by a visitor ought to be enough.

I don't live in a place with rules like that, and I would not. I wonder if momo thought she was moving into a neighborhood where a visitor couldn't park in front of her house?

I want my clothesline, too, so I wouldn't move into a place with these rules.

I am just surprised at the inspector saying the model of the truck offended him.
More than likely the "official" was called by a neighbor, or I guess he could live in the neighborhood.
I hate that kind of thing as well. I moved into a new neighborhood, a few years ago, and for about two weeks, left my enclosed utility trailer in my driveway. I got a nasty visit from one of the neighborhood "patrol officers" who complained and then called the lady who was the enforcer of the subdivision. I felt like a "heel", but I refused to go put the trailer in a storage area for two weeks while we finsihhed clearing the garage for it to be stored there.
I don't think the issue is that a truck is on the side of the road. It's a late model "mud truck". The mud trucks that I've seen are usually pretty beat up and completely covered in mud.

One thing that the original post left out was how long the mud truck was parked on the street. A visitor leaving it there for a few days is one thing, but for the city to send someone out I'm guessing it was there for much longer.

It takes a lot of hard work for someone to make their house and yard look nice. It takes lots of people working hard to make a neighborhood look nice. All it takes is one eyesore to ruin it.

Like I said, the solution is pretty simple. Wash the truck, park it in the driveway or yard. Living in a big neighborhood requires consideration of your neighbors.
quote:
Originally posted by NashBama:
It takes a lot of hard work for someone to make their house and yard look nice. It takes lots of people working hard to make a neighborhood look nice. All it takes is one eyesore to ruin it.

This is exactly why I don't live in a HOA neighborhood. If one eyesore ruins your perfect yard, perfect house and perfect world, then you really need a reality check. What kills me is when a neighborhood sells itself on being a warm, friendly place to live but the offended "neighbor" doesn't even have the courage or character to politely confront the "offender". They've gotten their panties in a wad and yet they aren't mature enough to handle the alleged problem like an adult- they run to "Big Brother" and tattle. That is not a good neighbor- unless you live in Victory Towers.

Like I said, the solution is pretty simple. Wash the truck, park it in the driveway or yard. Living in a big neighborhood requires consideration of your neighbors.


This is funny because where I used to live, there was a city ordinance banning parking in the yard because it was considered "trashy". This was only really a problem in the poorer sections of town; no one in the nicer, upper-end neighborhoods would think of driving over their pristinely manicured, weed free yard. ****ed if you do, ****ed if you don't.
quote:
It isn't abandoned! It's someone vehicle!


The City person was just doing his job. If you really want to blame someone, look in the mirror.

If it looked like crap and was parked on the side of the road for any extended period, I would complain, too.

The original poster is one of those who beleives they can do anything they want on their property. They are wrong. I live in that neighborhood, too. These are homes prices from 250k to a few million. We take pride in our homes. You do not have a right to even temporarily devalue it by allowing a friend with a junk truck to park in the road.

The city of Florence THANKFULLY has an enforcement unit that investigates violations of city code. The fact is that the side if the road is not a parking spot. If you park a crappy looking vehicle in your driveway, then I dare anyone to say a word (unless it is obviously abandoned and on blocks).

You volunteered to abide by city ordinances and neighborhood covenants when you moved into that neighborhood. If you don't like them, then I invite you to move to the county where there are no such prohibitions.
I am certain that Florence has an ordinance against parking it the yard. I'm pretty sure it is perfectly legal to park against the curb unless it's in front of a fire hydrant, a certain distance from an intersection, etc and so on unless it is posted as a no parking zone.

Bottom line is some snooty neighbor was offended by the looks of the vehicle and probably knows the homeowner but didn't have the common courtesy to ask her self that the truck be moved. I'm pretty sure that every house in Heathrow has a garage and the homeowner could have let the friend move the truck into the garage. He might have had someone asked him, but no!!! Let's call city hall and see if we can have it towed away. Trashy neighbors!! I think every house in my neighborhood should be left empty so there is no one to offend my sensibilities.

Wonder if the secret caller went to Church on Sunday? I hope the sermon was on tolerance.
quote:
Originally posted by Jon:
I am certain that Florence has an ordinance against parking it the yard. I'm pretty sure it is perfectly legal to park against the curb unless it's in front of a fire hydrant, a certain distance from an intersection, etc and so on unless it is posted as a no parking zone.

Bottom line is some snooty neighbor was offended by the looks of the vehicle and probably knows the homeowner but didn't have the common courtesy to ask her self that the truck be moved. I'm pretty sure that every house in Heathrow has a garage and the homeowner could have let the friend move the truck into the garage. He might have had someone asked him, but no!!! Let's call city hall and see if we can have it towed away. Trashy neighbors!! I think every house in my neighborhood should be left empty so there is no one to offend my sensibilities.

Wonder if the secret caller went to Church on Sunday? I hope the sermon was on tolerance.
Wink
quote:
Originally posted by HomesickGirl:
I can't understand people who are offended by a pick up truck parked on the side of the road. Especially, I can't understand people being offended by the model year of the truck? If it was on blocks, I could understand, but a working truck? And a visitor to someone's home?

What about being neighborly? Sounds like a new baby is coming. They might have some company. Let the people who are from out of town who are staying in the home park on the side of the road so that other visitors can park in the driveway.

I would not want to live in a neighborhood with people who are so easily 'offended'. It's a truck. If this gives people a 'bad impression' of me, that just shows that these aren't people I want to impress in the first place.

As for the inspector...if he really did say that a later model would be ok, I would need to see the ordinance that delineates what years are acceptable.

It's a visitor, and there a new baby coming. I'm not saying you have to let the Clampetts pitch a tent in your neighborhood. I just think a little tolerance wouldn't kill anyone.
.......Good Post!!
quote:
Bottom line is some snooty neighbor was offended by the looks of the vehicle and probably knows the homeowner but didn't have the common courtesy to ask her self that the truck be moved.


And the problem with that is?

The neighbor should have the common courtesy to NOT allow a crappy looking truck to be parked on the road for an extended period.
quote:
Originally posted by Jon:
I am certain that Florence has an ordinance against parking it the yard. I'm pretty sure it is perfectly legal to park against the curb unless it's in front of a fire hydrant, a certain distance from an intersection, etc and so on unless it is posted as a no parking zone.

Bottom line is some snooty neighbor was offended by the looks of the vehicle and probably knows the homeowner but didn't have the common courtesy to ask her self that the truck be moved. I'm pretty sure that every house in Heathrow has a garage and the homeowner could have let the friend move the truck into the garage. He might have had someone asked him, but no!!! Let's call city hall and see if we can have it towed away. Trashy neighbors!! I think every house in my neighborhood should be left empty so there is no one to offend my sensibilities.

Wonder if the secret caller went to Church on Sunday? I hope the sermon was on tolerance.


Also, last I checked, it wasnt the citys job to enforce neighborhood covenants. Thats a job for the civil courts, not the city.

Florence does have an ordinance about parking in the yard, so thats a no go. But last I checked, parking on the curb is completely legal (barring yellow painted curbs, handicap spots, ect), unless a sign states different.

If I park my dirty jeep on the curb and you dont like the fact that it is dirty, get out there and wash it yourself. I may even thank you for doing it....
I live in a subdivision, and I don't want a bunch of people parking all over the street, in the yards, etc. Everyone understands that people visit and things like that, and that SOMETIMES a car(s) needs to be parked on the street. No big deal.

The problem is when people do it ALL THE TIME. Some people will park their own car(s) in the street daily like it's an extension of their driveway. If you want to park cars all over the place, move out in the county.
quote:
Originally posted by BigDawg101:
I live in a subdivision, and I don't want a bunch of people parking all over the street, in the yards, etc. Everyone understands that people visit and things like that, and that SOMETIMES a car(s) needs to be parked on the street. No big deal.

The problem is when people do it ALL THE TIME. Some people will park their own car(s) in the street daily like it's an extension of their driveway. If you want to park cars all over the place, move out in the county.


Here is the problem with that, Dawg, the neighbor who is parking in the street pays taxes just like you and, as long as there is not an ordinance preventing them from parking there, they have every right to (unless your covenants prevent it, but that would be a civil issue, not a police issue). Your recourse would be to petition your city council to enact an ordinance with a time limit for street parking (or certain time periods that its not allowed.)

Being neighborly is a two way street. Had I been in the thread starters position, I would get real familiar with the ordinances in the area. Then, if it wasnt against the law, I would park my muddy jeep in the street every day. If there was a time limit, I would make sure I move it just enough for it to be legally parked. I consider it pretty rude of someone to complain about that truck, particularly if they were from out of town and had out of town tags. I would gladly return the favor with a similiar rude gesture.

Jeepin
quote:
Originally posted by Sofa King:
quote:
It isn't abandoned! It's someone vehicle!


The City person was just doing his job. If you really want to blame someone, look in the mirror.

If it looked like crap and was parked on the side of the road for any extended period, I would complain, too.

The original poster is one of those who beleives they can do anything they want on their property. They are wrong. I live in that neighborhood, too. These are homes prices from 250k to a few million. We take pride in our homes. You do not have a right to even temporarily devalue it by allowing a friend with a junk truck to park in the road.

The city of Florence THANKFULLY has an enforcement unit that investigates violations of city code. The fact is that the side if the road is not a parking spot. If you park a crappy looking vehicle in your driveway, then I dare anyone to say a word (unless it is obviously abandoned and on blocks).

You volunteered to abide by city ordinances and neighborhood covenants when you moved into that neighborhood. If you don't like them, then I invite you to move to the county where there are no such prohibitions.


So if I wanted to visit a friend in that part of town I would have to walk there since my vehicle is older with the paint falling off? Doesn't sound like a nice neighborhood to me. What city codes were violated?
I didnt think about the manure, I like it.

I was remodeling my house not too long ago, and had to park one of my vehicles on the street (my new car) because I had furniture in the garage. My neighbor said something about how hes getting old and cant see, he hoped he didnt back into my car while it was in the street (letting me know he didnt like me parking on the street.)

I said 'Well, I sure hope you have insurance.'

I just dont understand people who think that they are better than everyone else. To the person who stated that if we want to park wherever, we should move to the country: Guess what - you have the same option. If you dont like your neighbors, move somewhere where you dont have any....

Jeepin
quote:
Originally posted by Lets Go Jeepin':
I didnt think about the manure, I like it.

I was remodeling my house not too long ago, and had to park one of my vehicles on the street (my new car) because I had furniture in the garage. My neighbor said something about how hes getting old and cant see, he hoped he didnt back into my car while it was in the street (letting me know he didnt like me parking on the street.)

I said 'Well, I sure hope you have insurance.'

I just dont understand people who think that they are better than everyone else. To the person who stated that if we want to park wherever, we should move to the country: Guess what - you have the same option. If you dont like your neighbors, move somewhere where you dont have any....

Jeepin


To your previous post, of course there has to be an ordinance in place for any of this to matter. Many subdivisions have such rules that existed at the moment the subdivision was created.

As to this post, be careful about depending on someone else's insurance covering your car if it gets hit while parked on the street. If your car gets hit on a subdivision road that is not a "public road or highway," you're going to be SOL...lol.
Lawguy or someone else can confirm, but ordinances are not enacted for particular neighborhoods, covenants are. Covenants are defined as "A binding agreement; a compact." It is not a law. That means that you cannot call the city to come out and enforce your agreement. Thats for the civil courts, not the police. Your subdivision 'rules' would be considered covenants. Most subdivision roads are considered 'public right of way,' unless they are private subdivision without access to the general public. Chances are, if the city paves your road or maintains it, it is a public right of way. My neighbors insurance would be responsible for damage done on a public right of way (and a private right of way if they were found at fault by the insurance companies) AND the city would file an accident report.

I think you are referring to a situation similiar to a parking lot accident, where it is harder to get a city to file an accident report and insurance companies have to fight amongst themselves for payment. While this may apply to a private subdivision (no access to the public), I dont believe this has any relevance to most neighborhoods in this area.

Jeepin
Disclaimer: I don't profess to be any expert in this area, but I'll give it a stab. Jeepin' is correct in that city ordinances apply to the whole city, not a particular area. You could go to the city court or clerk and ask to see the Municipal Code of ____________ to find particular ordinances for a given city. Almost all cities just adopt the applicable state statutes for most offenses. There are some ordinances that have no state counterpart like dog leash laws, noise ordinances, curfews, etc. TO MY KNOWLEDGE there is no city ordinance in Florence prohibiting parking on any public street unless specifically designated or too close to a fire hydrant, blocking a driveway, etc.

Covenants, conditions, and restrictions (CC&Rs) apply to probably most subdivisions, especially if there is a HOA. They are initially ratified by the original owners or the builder and might address such things as parking, type of fences allowed, mailboxes, allowable paint colors, or practically anything the owners want to address. If you pull the CC&Rs from some of the older subdivisions you will find rules excluding persons of color unless they are domestic servants. Those of course are no longer enforceable for obvious reasons. I've lived in places that didn't allow RVs or boats to be parked in the driveway, but instead REQUIRED that they be parked on the street.

As far as insurance, accident reports, etc. there are some differences between public streets and private streets. As a broad generalization, the police won't respond to an accident on private property unless there is a serious injury or death. Some gated communities are totally "private," including the streets. They may have their own security and the HOA is responsible for maintaining the streets. I don't know anything about the subdivision in question but from what I can tell the streets are public. Developers usually build the streets, curbs, and sidewalks if any at first. Then the city/county will inspect them on completion and eventually take them over. In this case I suppose the homeowners could "pressure" the offending owner to have his guest move the truck, but I don't think there is any recourse with the court other than suing for breach of covenant. Again, I'm no expert but this is the best explanation I have.
I'm pretty sure I read in the original post that the subdivision in question is Heathrow. It's found by turning left at the first light while heading north on Cloverdale Road after crossing Cox Creek parkway. It really is a beautiful neighborhood. It would be the perfect place to replace the strip or McFarland for today's youth since cruising there is no longer possible/allowed.
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If you turn into heathrow across from the BP station and go past the older houses and come to the new houses. At the 2nd house on the left there are always 2 or more cars parked in the street at the curb. These cars are always dusty and have scatches all over them,not the best looking cars. They are not parked next to the cars and home owners driveway, but are parked at the far end of their house next to their neighbors driveway. If you did not know better you would associate the cars with the wrong house. If you are pulling out of the non car owners house, you can not see coming traffic from the left because the cars block the view. You have to have half of your car in the street before you can see if it is clear. Just wondering how this home owner can get away with parking in the street, but some people have a problem with a certain person doing it.

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